April 11, 2022

In the Middle, a Chimera Warm-Up Programming: 04.21 — 05.03

APRIL 21: DOUBLE BOOK LAUNCH + ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION

Art in the Age of Machine Learning | Sofian Audry

rom 3 pm @ Anteism Books (435 Rue Beaubien Ouest, #100, Montreal) Authors Christopher Salter and Sofian Audry will get together to discuss their recent publications, respectively, “Art in the Age of Machine Learning” (MIT Press, 2021) and “Sensing machines: How sensors shape our everyday life” (MIT Press, 2022). The live-streamed roundtable will be followed by a book launch and signature session. Both authors entangle art, culture and social-cultural responses to technology. 


Audry’s Art in the Age of Machine Learning focuses on artistic practices at the intersection of machine learning and new media art, providing conceptual tools and historical perspectives for new media artists, musicians, composers, writers, curators, and theorists. Looking at works from a broad range of practices from media art to music and literature, Audry connects machine learning art to such earlier artistic practices as cybernetics art, artificial life art, and evolutionary art. The book describes artistic practice through the fundamental design of machine learning algorithms, considering learning procedures, models, and the role of data in machine learning art.

Salter’s new book, Sensing Machines, examines how we are tracked, surveilled, tantalized, and seduced by machines ranging from smart watches and mood trackers to massive immersive art installations. There are more of these electronic devices in the world than there are people—in 2020, thirty to fifty billion of them (versus 7.8 billion people), with more than a trillion expected in the next decade. Sensing technology turns our experience into data; but the book’s story isn’t just about what these machines want from us, but what we want from them—new sensations, the thrill of the uncanny, and magic that will transport us from our daily grind.

______________________________-

Over the past decade, an artistic movement has emerged that draws on machine learning as both inspiration and medium. In this book, transdisciplinary artist-researcher Sofian Audry examines artistic practices at the intersection of machine learning and new media art, providing conceptual tools and historical perspectives for new media artists, musicians, composers, writers, curators, and theorists. Audry looks at works from a broad range of practices, including new media installation, robotic art, visual art, electronic music and sound, and electronic literature, connecting machine learning art to such earlier artistic practices as cybernetics art, artificial life art, and evolutionary art. 

Machine learning underlies computational systems that are biologically inspired, statistically driven, agent-based networked entities that program themselves. Audry explains the fundamental design of machine learning algorithmic structures in terms accessible to the nonspecialist while framing these technologies within larger historical and conceptual spaces. Audry debunks myths about machine learning art, including the ideas that machine learning can create art without artists and that machine learning will soon bring about superhuman intelligence and creativity. Audry considers learning procedures, describing how artists hijack the training process by playing with evaluative functions; discusses trainable machines and models, explaining how different types of machine learning systems enable different kinds of artistic practices; and reviews the role of data in machine learning art, showing how artists use data as a raw material to steer learning systems and arguing that machine learning allows for novel forms of algorithmic remixes.

https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/art-age-machine-learning

Sensing Machines: How Sensors Shape Our Everyday Life | Chris Salter

Sensing machines are everywhere in our world. As we move through the day, electronic sensors and computers adjust our thermostats, guide our Roombas, count our steps, change the orientation of an image when we rotate our phones. There are more of these electronic devices in the world than there are people—in 2020, thirty to fifty billion of them (versus 7.8 billion people), with more than a trillion expected in the next decade. In Sensing Machines, Chris Salter examines how we are tracked, surveilled, tantalized, and seduced by machines ranging from smart watches and mood trackers to massive immersive art installations.

Salter, an artist/scholar who has worked with sensors and computers for more than twenty years, explains that the quantification of bodies, senses, and experience did not begin with the surveillance capitalism practiced by Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, and Google but can be traced back to mathematical and statistical techniques of the nineteenth century. He describes the emergence of the “sensed self,” investigating how sensor technology has been deployed in music and gaming, programmable and immersive art environments, driving, and even eating, with e-tongues and e-noses that can taste and smell for us. Sensing technology turns our experience into data; but Salter’s story isn’t just about what these machines want from us, but what we want from them—new sensations, the thrill of the uncanny, and magic that will transport us from our daily grind.

https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/sensing-machines

APRIL 27

TEXT

MAY 3RD

Tatiana Koroleva and the artists from their performance cohort from the Body Archeology: Ancestral Memory in the Context of (Im)Migration workshop series welcome you on May 3rd, 2022 at 6 PM EST for a presentation of their findings and developed projects. 

The presentation will take place at the Intermedia/Cyberarts Production Studio (Concordia, EV. 6.635) and will last approximately two hours. 

Performances by artists: 

Anissa Boukili 
Danielle Douez  
Tricia Enns 
Somaye Farhan 
Goldjian/ Anne Goldenberg
Myro Le Ber Assiani 
Eliza Mcfarlane 
c t p

Concordia’s EV building is fully accessible, and some seating will be provided. Mask wearing for attendees is required, and we will observe social distancing measures to the best of our ability.

ON THE WORKSHOP:

In this workshop, we will explore a variety of ways our genetic memory can be activated in the process of performance creation with the purpose of reviewing and connecting to the history of our ancestors. Focusing specifically on the experiences of migration, immigration, displacement and relocation as a part of global history, the workshop proposes to activate the invisible link between our cultures of origin and our present moment. Opening the space for connecting to our roots while also acknowledging the hybridity of (im)migrant’s experiences and identities, we will focus on creating individual and group projects to venerate our ancestral past and to give voices to the parts of our identities that often remain silenced in a new cultural context. Using the framework of ritual and a variety of performance art methodologies, this workshop brings forward the concepts of empathetic presence, collaboration, dialogic witnessing, and awareness of belonging to a larger community as fundamental principles of performance art creation. This workshop is suitable for international students and faculty, immigrants, travellers, and/or anyone interested in exploring ancestral memory and the multiplicity of ways it continuously affects our present. 

The workshop is organised and facilitated by Tatiana Koroleva, a multi-disciplinary artist, poet, educator, and researcher who works in the mediums of performance art, video art and creative writing. Currently, Tatiana teaches at the Department of Studio Arts, Concordia University (Montreal, QC). Her work is grounded in the subjects of ancestral memory, migration, intergenerational trauma and search for personal and collective healing. www.tatianakoroleva.com